LEARN TO SWIM

Take swimming lessons and practice your skills on a regular basis. The Beach offers five levels of U.S. Coast Guard approved swimming lessons at the park.

WEAR A LIFEJACKET IF YOU CANNOT SWIM OR IF YOU ARE JUST LEARNING TO SWIM

A lifejacket will keep you afloat in deep water. Don’t rely on substitutes. The use of flotation devices and inflatable toys cannot replace parental supervision. Such devices could suddenly shift position, lose air, or slip out from underneath, leaving the child in a dangerous situation.

NEVER DIVE OR JUMP INTO UNKNOWN WATERS

Never dive into any lake or river. Tree stumps, rocks and floating logs can cause serious injury.

ALWAYS MAKE SURE A LIFEGUARD IS ON DUTY

Never enter water that is unsupervised by an adult or lifeguard.

PROTECT YOUR SKIN

Sunlight contains two kinds of UV rays — UVA increases the risk of skin cancer, skin aging, and other skin diseases. UVB causes sunburn and can lead to skin cancer. Limit the amount of direct sunlight you receive between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. and wear a sunscreen with a sun protection factor containing a high rating such as 15. We recommend Bullfrog Sunblock.

KNOW LOCAL WEATHER CONDITIONS

Make sure the water and weather conditions are safe. Water conducts electricity, so it is wise to stop swimming, boating, or any activities on the water as soon as you see or hear a storm. Also, heavy rains can make certain areas dangerous.

DRINK PLENTY OF WATER REGULARLY AND OFTEN EVEN IF YOU DO NOT FEEL THIRSTY

Your body needs water to keep cool. Avoid drinks with alcohol or caffeine in them. They can make you feel good briefly but make the heat’s effects on your body worse. This is especially true with beer, which dehydrates the body.

WATCH FOR SIGNS OF HEAT STROKE

The victim’s temperature control system, which produces sweating to cool the body, stops working. Signals include hot, red, and dry skin; changes in consciousness, rapid, weak pulse, and rapid, shallow breathing. Call 9-1-1 or your local EMS number. Move the person to a cooler place. Quickly cool the body by wrapping wet sheets around the body and fan it. If you have ice packs or cold packs, place them on each of the victim’s wrists and ankles, in the armpits and on the neck to cool the large blood vessels. Watch for signals of breathing problems and make sure the airway is clear. Keep the person lying down.

WEAR EYE PROTECTION

Sunglasses are like sunscreen for your eyes and protect against damage that can occur from UV rays. Be sure to wear sunglasses with labels that indicate that they absorb at least 90 percent of UV sunlight. Whenever you are swimming, try to avoid what the American Red Cross calls the “dangerous too’s”:

  • too tired
  • too far away from your friends or from safety
  • too cold
  • too much sun
STAY WITH A BUDDY

Partner up with a buddy on your visit so someone always knows where you are. If you get lost or have a question go to the main First Aid Station close to the WavePool.

READ AND OBEY ALL BEACH SIGNS

Always ride rides feet first and face up.

WEAR A BEACH LIFEJACKET IN CERTAIN POOLS

Beach lifejackets are U.S. Coast Guard approved and available to all our guests at no charge. Ask a lifeguard to help you put the lifejacket on correctly. All straps must be fastened and snug at all times.

LISTEN FOR LIFEGUARD WHISTLES

If you hear a long whistle and see a lifeguard motioning a circle above their head that means The Beach spotted lightning or heavy thunder and you must exit the pools immediately. If a lifeguard blows a short quick whistle they are trying to get your attention, please listen and obey the lifeguards commands for your safety. When you hear a long whistle and see lifeguard pointing to a certain area of the park, that is their system to help supervisors and First Aid find a possible emergency. This emergency could be anything from heat exhaustion, a swimmer struggling in deep water, or a minor cut or scrape. Please clear the sidewalk when you hear this whistle to allow Beach employees to get to the scene as fast as possible.

EYE PROTECTION

Wear goggles if you are swimming under water, but do not wear masks that cover your nose.  Goggles are not allowed down body slides.

If you ever have any questions about Water Safety on your visit to The Beach please ask any Lifeguard or First Aid Staff Member. The Beach is one of the safest waterparks in the United States and Safety is our Top Priority.

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